Pages Navigation Menu

Honey I Think I’m a Little Gay

This past week, actor James Franco has attracted a storm of attention on social media for his statement that in his personal life he is straight, but in his professional life he is “a little gay”.  Franco was commenting on playing the role of a gay man in the films “I Am Michael” and “Wild Horses”, and his newest role in “King Cobra.”

Honey I Think I'm a Little Gay

James Franco attends a signing for his new book “Straight James/Gay James” at Book Soup on March 6, 2016 in West Hollywood, California. Credit: Jason Kempin/Getty Images

The phrase “a little gay” might be a shocker to the general public, but it is no shock to straight spouses.  Many of us have heard it before. We’ve heard it as part of a lie, a belief that some of our spouses have had that it is better to tell us the truth in small pieces, than just admit “Honey I think I’m gay.”

If they admit it at all. Some never will.

For many of our spouses, saying they are “a little gay” conveys an expectation that since they aren’t TOTALLY gay we should just deal with it, and if there is a problem it is our fault.

We are the last people to ever define who someone else is in terms of their sexual identity.  Heck, some of us have been accused of MAKING our spouses gay, as if we had that power, or of being gay ourselves and thus “obsessed” with accusing our spouses. When our husbands or wives come to us with the truth about  their sexuality, whether they are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender, we are devastated.  But at least we know. We can make choices for moving ahead in our own lives, and decide if we want to stay married, pursue an “open marriage” or get a divorce.  We can also begin to put the pieces of our own shattered self image back together.

For many of us, a declaration of being “a little gay” is a lie that is intended to erase a bigger lie. Being “a little gay” hints at bisexuality, but doesn’t actually admit it. Sometimes a declaration of being “a little gay” is accompanied with the statement that EVERYONE is “a little gay” and that WE are the liars for not admitting that in our heterosexuality. Consequently, when something goes wrong in the relationship, or if we react negatively, it is seen as being our fault. Straight spouses are certainly not without our faults, but we don’t have the option of truly examining how they affect a relationship if the other person in the relationship is lying to themselves and to us about their sexual preference.

Some of us have also seen over the years that our spouses who claim to be “a little gay” become “a lot more gay” as time goes on.

James Franco’s personal sexuality is his own business.  He should realize, if he doesn’t already, that saying he’s “a little gay” triggers misgivings in women who have experienced deception from a gay or bisexual lover, or who are children of mixed orientation marriages. His personal honesty in his private life is his business.  We do have some questions, however, for him and for other actors who play characters that are not like them.

If playing a gay character can make Franco realize he’s “a little gay”, can playing a straight character make a gay actor realize he’s “a little straight”?

Both Tom Hanks and Tom Selleck have played gay characters and yet they live lives as heterosexual men.  Did playing those roles make them “a little gay”? Or did playing those roles make them reach into all the human qualities that they understand and can interpret, making them great actors?

And just who is the real Walton Goggins anyway?  He’s played a transsexual (Venus on Sons of Anarchy), a tough and tender outlaw who is obsessed with a woman (Boyd Crowder on Justified) and a deranged fight club trainer who tortures enslaved fighters (Django Unchained). Is he a little trans?  Or a little deranged? Or a little obsessed? Or is he a really talented actor who brings great depth and understanding to complicated characters?

For that matter, going back to a time when gay actors could not be their true selves in private life, did playing straight men who loved and charmed the ladies make Rock Hudson “a little straight” in his private life? What about Robert Reed, the iconic husband and father on The Brady Bunch?  Did playing the perfect husband make him “a little straight”?

Susan Olsen played Cindy Brady, the youngest daughter on the popular television series which ran from 1969-1974. “Bob was a family man,”  she said on her Facebook page in 2013.”Had he been allowed to form a relationship with another man, he would have been the best husband ever and might still be alive.”

Apparently he brought those qualities to his role as Mike Brady, a beloved heterosexual husband and father.  However, his talent and performance did not make him “a little straight” in his very private personal life.

We live in an era when definitions of gender and sexuality are sometimes perceived as being fluid. Lets just make sure that all that fluid doesn’t wash away the necessity for honesty in relationships and being true to one’s self.

Related article

One Comment

  1. “We are the last people to ever define who someone else is in terms of their sexual identity.”

    But isn’t that exactly what you are trying to do with this very blog post? James Franco was obviously mocking the media’s and the public’s obsession with his sexuality, and the hunger to define people by their sexuality.

    I guess I don’t understand what this blog article is trying to say. Remove the question of sexuality and insert a different kind of acting role. Does playing a serial killer make one just a little bit more of a murderer? Does playing an action hero give one a few more superpowers? Does playing a President make one a little bit presidential?

    Of course not. That is obvious. Franco didn’t say that playing gay was what makes him a little gay. He didn’t say it was a cause-and-effect, he said he has a purpose in it:

    “it means that I can be a figure for change… who can show the straight community that many of their definitions are outdated and boring. And I can also show the gay community that many of the things about themselves that they are giving up to join the straight community are actually valuable and beautiful.”

    Keep in mind that one of his brothers is openly gay, and he is vocally supportive of his brother.

    I suspect James Franco would be very supportive of the SSN and what it wants to achieve: the elimination of the MOM phenomenon. But let’s not confuse performing arts with real life. And let’s start by admitting that we do indeed define people by their sexuality… at least to some degree. Your last paragraph says as much:

    “We live in an era when definitions of gender and sexuality are sometimes perceived as being fluid. Lets just make sure that all that fluid doesn’t wash away the necessity for honesty in relationships and being true to one’s self.”

    Isn’t that closing statement somewhat in conflict with the earlier idea that we are “the last people to define someone by their sexuality?” It seems so to me.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available